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SOUTHDOWN PLANTATION HOUSE/THE TERREBONNE MUSEUM

Southdown Plantation House is a 19th-century sugar plantation manor house and home to the Terrebonne Museum of history and culture. It is located in Houma, Louisiana, southwest of New Orleans in Terrebonne parish. Southdown house was built as a one-story Greek Revival style house in 1859 by sugar planter William J. Minor. His son Henry C. Minor added the second floor in 1893 and changed the architecture to the Queen Anne style of the late Victorian period. The Southdown Plantation owners were responsible in the 1920s for propagating a sugar cane variety resistant to mosaic disease, thus saving the sugar industry in Louisiana. Since 1972, Southdown has been owned by the non-profit Terrebonne Historical & Cultural Society and is currently open to the public as a museum. Exhibits include original bedroom furniture of the Minor family and other period antique furnishings; a history and culture room; a Mardi Gras room; a Native Peoples Room; changing works by local artists; a sugar industry room; 135 Boehm and Doughty porcelain birds; Charles Gilbert art collection; Thad St. Martin literature collection; and a re-creation of the Washington, D.C. office of U.S. Senator Allen J. Ellender. An extensive arts & crafts fair is held annually in Spring (Saturday one week before Easter) and Fall (first Saturday in November).

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